More Info

  • Common Symptoms of Separation Anxiety

    The following is a list of symptoms that may indicate separation anxiety:

    Urinating and Defecating
    Some dogs urinate or defecate when left alone or separated from their guardians. If a dog urinates or defecates in the presence of his guardian, his house soiling probably isn’t caused by separation anxiety.

    Barking and Howling
    A dog who has separation anxiety might bark or howl when left alone or when separated from his guardian. This kind of barking or howling is persistent and doesn’t seem to be triggered by anything except being left alone.

    Chewing, Digging and Destruction
    Some dogs with separation anxiety chew on objects, door frames or window sills, dig at doors and doorways, or destroy household objects when left alone or separated from their guardians. These behaviors can result in self-injury, such as broken teeth, cut and scraped paws and damaged nails. If a dog’s chewing, digging and destruction are caused by separation anxiety, they don’t usually occur in his guardian’s presence.

    Escaping
    A dog with separation anxiety might try to escape from an area where he’s confined when he’s left alone or separated from his guardian. The dog might attempt to dig and chew through doors or windows, which could result in self-injury, such as broken teeth, cut and scraped front paws and damaged nails. If the dog’s escape behavior is caused by separation anxiety, it doesn’t occur when his guardian is present.

    Pacing
    Some dogs walk or trot along a specific path in a fixed pattern when left alone or separated from their guardians. Some pacing dogs move around in circular patterns, while others walk back and forth in straight lines. If a dog’s pacing behavior is caused by separation anxiety, it usually doesn’t occur when his guardian is present.

    Coprophagia
    When left alone or separated from their guardians, some dogs defecate and then consume all or some of their excrement. If a dog eats excrement because of separation anxiety, he probably doesn’t perform that behavior in the presence of his guardian.

    Make an appointment to discuss treatment options for one or more of the above symptoms of separation anxiety! 



  • Sue Kline Pet Bereavement Program

    The loss of a pet can be emotionally devastating. Pets become part of the fabric of our families, and they leave a huge hole when they are no longer with us.  The depth of grief we feel over a pet's loss can also catch us off-guard.  Even when we think we are prepared, the reality of no longer having your best friend around can stir up deep emotions that are hard to process.

    The loss of a beloved pet can carry intense feelings of grief and sadness. However, not everyone can offer the understanding and support you need. Join us and you will find an accepting environment to deal with your  feelings amidst  others with similar losses. We will discuss the normal grief process and tips for healthy coping.

    The group sessions will be led by Mary Feaster, a Licensed Professional Counselor who also volunteers at Pawmetto Lifeline. Attendees are encouraged to bring a picture of their pet to the session.

    Pet Loss Support Group Counseling sessions will be held on the 4th Sunday* of each month from 3:00 pm-4:30 pm.

    This program is offered at no charge although donations are welcome. If you have questions, contact Karen Deas at 803-465-9173 or kdeas@pawmettolifeline.org.

    We also recommend reviewing some helpful information on dealing with the loss of a pet from the ASPCA.